Friday, February 23, 2024
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“New Zealand’s second least biased political news source” MediaBias

You can’t always get what you want

Grant Robertson is leaving Parliament for two new careers, having been frustrated and blocked from achieving some of his biggest political ambitions. So, he is returning to Dunedin, and, unusually for a former finance minister, with seemingly no ambitions to enter the business world. Instead, he will become Vice Chancellor of...

POLITIKToday

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Why Massey is broke

The Tertiary Education Commission has named the two universities it says are at high risk financially. They are Massey and Victoria. The Commission appeared before Parliament’s...

Dig this

Resources Minister Shane Jones yesterday told a breakfast hosted by Energy Resources Aotearoa precisely what they wanted to hear. “We campaigned to rehabilitate relegitimise and...

POLITIK  is subject to NZ Media Council procedures. A complaint must first be directed in writing, within one month of publication, to info@frontpage.co.nz  If not satisfied with the response, the complaint may be referred to the Media Council. See the online complaint form at www.mediacouncil.org.nz

He stood up to Muldoon and Lange and the Fiji army

Gerald Hensley, who died aged 88 on Saturday, was the key official who presided over the tumultuous events that followed the election of the...

National calls in its preferred consultants (again)

The Government has called in the same economics consultancy that worked on its aborted foreign buyers' tax to now help design a replacement for...

Why the lights might go out this winter

MPs yesterday had to confront the real cost of using electricity to move to net zero carbon emissions by 2040. The country's grid operator told a Select Committee of their many challenges, ranging from staff shortages to planning issues and...

Reimagining the Treaty

This is the text of an address given to the Waitangi dawn service on February 6 by Dr Alistair Reece. He is a farmer, historian, and public theologian. He holds postgraduate degrees in History, Tikanga Maori, and Theology, from Massey,...

Now for the big Maori sovereignty debate

No one summed up this year's events at Waitangi more presciently than Waitangi National Trust CEO Ben Dalton. He was speaking at the end of one of this year’s Waitangi innovations, a political forum on the National Marae which followed...

The Nats’ new liberals

Anyone watching or listening to this week's 12 maiden speeches from new National MPs might wonder what has happened to their party. Among the usual thanks to their electorate committees, prolonged family histories and boasting about their local regions were...

A Parliamentary idealist goes

James Shaw’s resignation yesterday as co-leader of the Greens marks the end of an era in New Zealand politics. Former Green MP Gareth Hughes told POLITIK yesterday that in a way Shaw's approach to politics traced right back to the...

Luxon’s carefully worded counter to Seymour

The State of the Nation speech yesterday from ACT leader David Seymour hardened up on his Treaty proposals after a week in which the Prime Minister adopted a much more conciliatory tone. It is clear that National and ACT are...

Ratana’s trumpet sounds a warning

David Seymour’s Bill to redefine the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi is now on a legislative death row, doomed to survive only until it gets to a Select Committee. If the Prime MInister said it once, he declared it...

From the Red Sea to Washington; our foreign policy drift

The decision announced yesterday to agree to a United States invitation to deploy New Zealand forces to the Red Sea to help counter the Houthis attacks on shipping was probably inevitable. And it will raise questions about whether the new...

Hobson’s choice; the Treaty or ACT

National Maori Development Minister Tama Potaka has made it pretty clear that his party will not support ACT’s proposed Treaty Principles referendum Bill. That decision is going to lead to some awkward Parliamentary moments, which are likely to see...

Luxon gets back on track — to 1975

There has been a faint but nevertheless uncomfortable echo of 1975 in Wellington these past few weeks. We’ve seen the same rush to remove as...

Not a good outlook

The headline figures in yesterday’s opening of the books are ominous from a political point of view for the new Government. The Half Yearly Economic...

Other things first before India Free Trade Agreement.

Trade Minister Todd McClay flew off to India yesterday to pursue a free trade agreement. He did so with advice from South Island sheep farmers...

The Covid showpiece; billions spent, records missing, advice ignored.

In late January 2020, the first year of Covid, the Labour-led Government announced it would spend $12 billion on what Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern...
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Peters: going the way of the USA

Just hours after the Prime Minister had insisted that New Zealand continued to maintain an "independent" foreign policy, his Foreign Minister was hinting that...

No surprises

Don’t expect any fiscal shocks or surprises when the books are opened on December 20 with the unveiling of the Half Yearly Economic and...

National’s new MP; the proud part-Maori boy raised in a state...

Probably not since 1975 have we seen a government take office up against such a wall of protest and complaint. That was highlighted yesterday, the...

Cooking the books

Finance Minister Nicola Willis late yesterday stopped only slightly short of accusing her predecessor Grant Robertson of cooking the books. She complained that the Half...

First big test coming

The first big test of the new Government's approach to Treaty matters is likely to be seen in the return of the Resource Management...

Backwards to the future

Prime Minister Christopher Luxon has confirmed that it will be back to the future on planning legislation. This will be just one of a number...